When it rains after sunset…

Rains are good. Especially, when you are sitting in your balcony and admiring how the place around you is turning green because of the incessant monsoon rains.  This is a view I’ve gotten used to recently.

Yeah, they are great when it’s a drizzle at 11am after a hot morning ride. They’re enjoyable when it starts pouring at 2pm and you have to take an impromptu chai, wait for bit and then ride again. My rides to Bangalore and Pune had it’s share of heavy rains and both didn’t matter because it was in broad daylight. Riding through strong breeze and into dark clouds always brings a sense of excitement.

However, rains aren’t fun all the time. They are deadly when it’s already past sunset especially when you wear prescription glasses. Then, the life in front of you will be a blur. Every time a headlight hits you, the only thing you end up seeing through your helmet and glasses would be something like this or even worse. You just realize your life (or someone else’s) is at risk for sure.

I’ve had a few of such dramatic moments when life became a blur. It scared the hell out of me. It also didn’t help that I’m usually the only one who wears glasses in my group.

Act 1 Scene 1: An unplanned weekend ride to Nizamabad went out of hand when it started to rain on our way back to city. We decided to wait until the rains stop – a terrible idea since the rains just wouldn’t stop. Eventually, we decided to ride and sun had set by then. It was raining so bad, that I couldn’t ride with the visor down or with my glasses on. I ended up asking my friend to ride slow, removed my glasses, and just tailed him all the way back to safety of the city lights. It’s then that I realized why the reflective stickers (white, red, and yellow) are a blessing.

Act 2 Scene 6:  We were doing the trip of our life – the ultimate riding wonder. It started drizzling around 3pm as we started our climb to Munnar. Our bad luck, the rains continued and as is the case in most of the hill stations, it’s accompanied by mist that reduces visibility to zero. Yes, I’m still wearing my glasses. This time, I tailed a tourist van for 2 hours before we reached our hotel safely.

Act 3 Scene 4: We had safely reached Bhimashanker on the Versys and for some reason, I wanted to see the temple that evening. I thought we had time and could come back before sunset – turned out to be a gross miscalculation (ps: I suck at any type of math). Add mist to the mix too along with bad roads. There was no vehicle to tail this time and I did the 12km ride back to the hotel on the second gear and almost went off the roads a few time.

Sunset + Rains + Prescription Glasses + Motorcycle  = Worst Idea. Avoid at any cost. 

Truth is, you can’t avoid such things when you keep going on rides. So some thoughts on how to overcome this mix.

 

  •  Glasses: A Lasik Surgery is the best option so you don’t need to wear glasses anymore. A cheaper alternative would be to just carry disposable lens in your kit that you can use if you are forced to ride in such situations.
  • Rains: Not sure how effective they are but I’ve come across these water repellent for plastics. I would love have carried this during all the 3 instances mentioned above to see how well they work. Pretty expensive though!
  • Hi-Viz: Do yourself and the word a favor by going hi-viz. Get some colors and get a lot of reflective material on your helmet and jacket. Neon is the new black when it comes to motorcycles.

Rule Book: Follow the sun – rise and ride with it and be sure to rest when it sets. Start your day as early as you can, you rider. Be safe!

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