Reading about riding.

A fractured ankle can only bring your riding to a halt but it can’t prevent you from reading about riding. What I realized pretty soon was that it’s as much fun reading about riding as it’s actually riding a motorcycle!

While it was 6-weeks long ‘stay at home’ path to recovery, I went (figuratively) on a few hundred rides with author, David L. Hough and learned so much about riding that I probably wouldn’t have had I continued to ride without this break.

It’s very easy to get carried away thinking that in the years of riding, I’ve probably mastered all the skills required to be a proficient rider for life. However, all it takes is one small article or a conversation to realize how little I actually know. These are learning I’m more than happy to learn from others’ experiences and mistakes than my own.

I’m grateful to have read these two books that will hopefully improve my riding skills when I get back from my longest riding slumber.

There is no way I can do justice to the books but the table of content remind us of all the areas of riding we need to master to ride safely for as long as our soul wishes (and live a long life too by not getting killed on the road either due to our own mistake or someone else’s)

  1. Canyon bites – basics of riding in the twisties 
  2. Motorcycle dynamics – don’t be surprised at how little you know! 
  3. Cornering tactics – corners always bring a smile, don’t they?
  4.  Urban traffic survival – because this is where we end up riding for most part of our lives
  5. Booby trap – nay, it’s not what you think it is. I’ll leave it to your imagination though.
  6. Special situations – oh yeah, most of these are common situations in India!

Isn’t that a comprehensive list? What makes it better are the photos that show what the author is talking about. Makes understanding even the complex situations pretty easy.

hough-proficient-motorcycling-more-delayed-apex

Some quotes just to get your started:

“The self-balancing action of a motorcycle front end is a result of the combined effects of a number of details, including rake, trail, steering head rise and fall, mass shift, contact patch location, and tire profiles.”

“less experienced riders look closer to the bike with a more fixed gaze, while skillful riders look farther ahead and frequently change their focus.”

“12 seconds represents about as far ahead as you can see details. If you’re not in the habit of looking that far ahead, then you should be working on that important technique.”

“it’s not only a matter of controlling the motorcycle you’re riding but also controlling the situation around you.” 

I really wish I had read this book around the time I was learning to ride. Although, I must admit, even 15 years later, it doesn’t seem to be too late to pick up some new skills, overcome few bad habits, and apply the right technique – especially if it promises to help me ride more with less risk and obviously has the potential to avoid a few accidents that the world has already learned from.

If you don’t have the patience to read the entire book, then read the part on braking – may reduce your braking distance significantly and even save your life one day. Of course, all of this is assuming you are wearing appropriate protective gears. Ride safe.

Are there other books you know of? Do share it in the comments.

 

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